Through the Looking-Glass. Занятие 9

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Аудиотренажёр

Chapter VI, Humpty Dumpty. Part II

22


‘To send all his horses and all his men,’ Alice interrupted, rather unwisely.

23


‘Now I declare that’s too bad!’ Humpty Dumpty cried, breaking into a sudden passion. ‘You’ve been listening at doors – and behind trees – and down chimneys – or you couldn’t have known it!’

24


‘I haven’t, indeed!’ Alice said very gently. ‘It’s in a book.’

25


‘Ah, well! They may write such things in a book,’ Humpty Dumpty said in a calmer tone. ‘That’s what you call a History of England, that is. Now, take a good look at me! I’m one that has spoken to a King, I am: mayhap you’ll never see such another: and, to show you I’m not proud, you may shake hands with me!’ And he grinned almost from ear to ear, as he leant forwards (and as nearly as possible fell off the wall in doing so) and offered Alice his hand. She watched him a little anxiously as she took it. ‘If he smiled much more, the ends of his mouth might meet behind,’ she thought: ‘and then I don’t know what would happen to his head! I’m afraid it would come off!’

26


‘Yes, all his horses and all his men,’ Humpty Dumpty went on. ‘They’d pick me up again in a minute, they would! However, this conversation is going on a little too fast: let’s go back to the last remark but one.’

27


‘I’m afraid I can’t quite remember it,’ Alice said very politely.

28


‘In that case we start afresh,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘and it’s my turn to choose a subject –’ (‘He talks about it just as if it was a game!’ thought Alice.) ‘So here’s a question for you. How old did you say you were?’

29


Alice made a short calculation, and said ‘Seven years and six months.’

30


‘Wrong!’ Humpty Dumpty exclaimed triumphantly. ‘You never said a word like it!’

31


‘I thought you meant “How old are you?”’ Alice explained.

32


‘If I’d meant that, I’d have said it,’ said Humpty Dumpty.

33


Alice didn’t want to begin another argument, so she said nothing.

34


‘Seven years and six months!’ Humpty Dumpty repeated thoughtfully. ‘An uncomfortable sort of age. Now if you’d asked my advice, I’d have said “Leave off at seven” – but it’s too late now.’

35


‘I never ask advice about growing,’ Alice said indignantly.

36


‘Too proud?’ the other inquired.

37


Alice felt even more indignant at this suggestion. ‘I mean,’ she said, ‘that one can’t help growing older.’

38


‘One can’t, perhaps,’ said Humpty Dumpty; ‘but two can. With proper assistance, you might have left off at seven.’

39


‘What a beautiful belt you’ve got on!’ Alice suddenly remarked. (They had had quite enough of the subject of age, she thought: and, if they really were to take turns in choosing subjects, it was her turn now.) ‘At least,’ she corrected herself on second thoughts, ‘a beautiful cravat, I should have said – no, a belt, I mean – I beg your pardon!’ she added in dismay, for Humpty Dumpty looked thoroughly offended, and she began to wish she hadn’t chosen that subject. ‘If I only knew,’ she thought to herself, ‘which was neck and which was waist!’

40


Evidently Humpty Dumpty was very angry, though he said nothing for a minute or two. When he did speak again, it was in a deep growl.

41


‘It is a – most – provoking – thing,’ he said at last, ‘when a person doesn’t know a cravat from a belt!’

42


‘I know it’s very ignorant of me,’ Alice said, in so humble a tone that Humpty Dumpty relented.

43


‘It’s a cravat, child, and a beautiful one, as you say. It’s a present from the White King and Queen. There now!’

44


‘Is it really?’ said Alice, quite pleased to find that she had chosen a good subject, after all.

45


‘They gave it me,’ Humpty Dumpty continued thoughtfully, as he crossed one knee over the other and clasped his hands round it, ‘they gave it me – for an unbirthday present.’

46


‘I beg your pardon?’ Alice said with a puzzled air.

47


‘I’m not offended,’ said Humpty Dumpty.

48


‘I mean, what is and unbirthday present?’

49


‘A present given when it isn’t your birthday, of course.’

50


Alice considered a little. ‘I like birthday presents best,’ she said at last.

51


‘You don’t know what you’re talking about!’ cried Humpty Dumpty. ‘How many days are there in a year?’

52


‘Three hundred and sixtyfive,’ said Alice.

53


‘And how many birthdays have you?’

54


‘One.’

55


‘And if you take one from three hundred and sixtyfive, what remains?’

56


‘Three hundred and sixtyfour, of course.’

57


Humpty Dumpty looked doubtful. ‘I’d rather see that done on paper,’ he said.

58


Alice couldn’t help smiling as she took out her memorandum-book, and worked the sum for him:

59


Humpty Dumpty took the book, and looked at it carefully. ‘That seems to be done right –’ he began.

60


‘You’re holding it upside down!’ Alice interrupted.

61


‘To be sure I was!’ Humpty Dumpty said gaily, as she turned it round for him. ‘I thought it looked a little queer. As I was saying, that seems to be done right – though I haven’t time to look it over thoroughly just now – and that shows that there are three hundred and sixtyfour days when you might get unbirthday presents –’

62


‘Certainly,’ said Alice.

63


‘And only one for birthday presents, you know. There’s glory for you!’

64


‘I don’t know what you mean by “glory,”’ Alice said.

65


Humpty Dumpty smiled contemptuously. ‘Of course you don’t – till I tell you. I meant “there’s a nice knockdown argument for you!”’

66


‘But “glory” doesn’t mean “a nice knockdown argument,”’ Alice objected.

67


‘When I use a word,’ Humpty Dumpty said, in rather a scornful tone, ‘it means just what I choose it to mean – neither more nor less.’

68


‘The question is,’ said Alice, ‘whether you can make words mean so many different things.’

69


‘The question is,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘which is to be master – that’s all.’

70


Alice was too much puzzled to say anything; so after a minute Humpty Dumpty began again. ‘They’ve a temper, some of them – particularly verbs: they’re the proudest – adjectives you can do anything with, but not verbs – however, I can manage the whole of them! Impenetrability! That’s what I say!’

71


‘Would you tell me, please,’ said Alice, ‘what that means?’

72


‘Now you talk like a reasonable child,’ said Humpty Dumpty, looking very much pleased. ‘I meant by “impenetrability” that we’ve had enough of that subject, and it would be just as well if you’d mention what you mean to do next, as I suppose you don’t mean to stop here all the rest of your life.’

73


‘That’s a great deal to make one word mean,’ Alice said in a thoughtful tone.

74


‘When I make a word do a lot of work like that,’ said Humpty Dumpty, ‘I always pay it extra.’

75


‘Oh!’ said Alice. She was too much puzzled to make any other remark.

76


‘Ah, you should see ’em come round me of a Saturday night,’ Humpty Dumpty went on, wagging his head gravely from side to side, ‘for to get their wages, you know.’

77


(Alice didn’t venture to ask what he paid them with; and so you see I can’t tell you.)

78


‘You seem very clever at explaining words, Sir,’ said Alice. ‘Would you kindly tell me the meaning of the poem called “Jabberwocky”?’

79


‘Let’s hear it,’ said Humpty Dumpty. ‘I can explain all the poems that were ever invented – and a good many that haven’t been invented just yet.’

80


This sounded very hopeful, so Alice repeated the first verse: –

81


‘Twas brillig, and the slithy toves

82


Did gyre and gimble in the wabe:

83


All mimsy were the borogoves,

84


And the mome raths outgrabe’.

85


‘That’s enough to begin with,’ Humpty Dumpty interrupted: ‘there are plenty of hard words there. “Brillig” means four o’clock in the afternoon – the time when you begin broiling things for dinner.’

86


‘That’ll do very well,’ said Alice: and “slithy”?’

87


‘Well, “slithy” means “lithe and slimy.” “Lithe” is the same as “active.” You see it’s like a portmanteau – there are two meanings packed up into one word.’

88


‘I see it now,’ Alice remarked thoughtfully: ‘and what are “toves”?’

89


‘Well, “toves” are something like badgers – they’re something like lizards – and they’re something like corkscrews.’

90


‘They must be very curiouslooking creatures.’

91


‘They are that,’ said Humpty Dumpty: ‘also they make their nests under sundials – also they live on cheese.’

92


‘And what’s to “gyre” and to “gimble”?’

93


‘To “gyre” is to go round and round like a gyroscope. To “gimble” is to make holes like a gimblet.’

94


‘And “the wabe” is the grassplot round a sundial, I suppose?’ said Alice, surprised at her own ingenuity.

95


‘Of course it is. It’s called “wabe,” you know, because it goes a long way before it, and a long way behind it’ –

96


‘And a long way beyond it on each side,’ Alice added.

97


‘Exactly so. Well, then, “mimsy” is “flimsy and miserable” (there’s another portmanteau for you). And a “borogove” is a thin shabbylooking bird with its feathers sticking out all round – something like a live mop.’

98


‘And then “mome raths”?’ said Alice. ‘I’m afraid I’m giving you a great deal of trouble.’

99


‘Well, a “rath” is a sort of green pig: but “mome” I’m not certain about. I think it’s short for “from home” – meaning that they’d lost their way, you know.’

100


‘And what does “outgrabe” mean?’

101


‘Well, “outgribing” is something between bellowing and whistling, with a kind of sneeze in the middle: however, you’ll hear it done, maybe – down in the wood yonder – and, when you’ve once heard it, you’ll be quite content. Who’s been repeating all that hard stuff to you?’

102


‘I read it in a book,’ said Alice. ‘But I had some poetry repeated to me, much easier than that, by – Tweedledee, I think it was.’

103


‘As to poetry, you know,’ said Humpty Dumpty, stretching out one of his great hands, ‘I can repeat poetry as well as other folk, if it comes to that –’

104


‘Oh, it needn’t come to that!’ Alice hastily said, hoping to keep him from beginning.

105


‘The piece I’m going to repeat,’ he went on without noticing her remark, ‘was written entirely for your amusement.’

106


Alice felt that in that case she really ought to listen to it, so she sat down, and said ‘Thank you’ rather sadly.

107


‘In winter, when the fields are white,

108


I sing this song for your delight –’

109


Only I don’t sing it,’ he added, as an explanation.

110


‘I see you don’t,’ said Alice.

111


‘If you can see whether I’m singing or not, you’re sharper eyes than most.’ Humpty Dumpty remarked severely. Alice was silent.

112


‘In spring, when woods are getting green,

113


I’ll try and tell you what I mean:’

114


‘Thank you very much,’ said Alice.

115


‘In summer, when the days are long,

116


Perhaps you’ll understand the song:

117


In autumn, when the leaves are brown,

118


Take pen and ink, and write it down.’

119


‘I will, if I can remember it so long,’ said Alice.

120


‘You needn’t go on making remarks like that,’ Humpty Dumpty said: ‘they’re not sensible, and they put me out.’

121


‘I sent a message to the fish:

122


I told them “This is what I wish.”

123


The little fishes of the sea,

124


They sent an answer back to me.

125


The little fishes’ answer was

126


“We cannot do it, Sir, because –”’

127


‘I’m afraid I don’t quite understand,’ said Alice.

128


‘It gets easier further on,’ Humpty Dumpty replied.

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Диана Семёнычева

Диана Семёнычева

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